Lamium purpureum

Other common names include red dead-nettle, purple dead-nettle, purple archangel, and  velikdenche.  Very similar to henbit and is also an introduced herbaceous winter annual in the Lamiaceae.  The leaves are petioled in deadnettle compared to sessile in henbit.  I also note that deadnettle tends to be a grayish green compared to a regular green in henbit.  Deadnettle is more common in north Louisiana but can be seen sporadically in south Louisiana.  A few plants pop up on Allen Acres. While researching this genus, I found that there are additional species in the genus Lamium including two perennial species, Lamium album and Lamium maculatum.  Both of these species are found in the northern United States and Canada.  Also, a third species here in this area, Lamium dissectum.  It is reported to have more deeply toothed leaves and is also called Lamium purpureum var incisum and Lamium hybridum. I can remember back in the early 70’s (that is the 1970’s so no 1870’s comments please) that the late Dr. Gene Rhodes of Louisiana Tech mentioned that there was a different plant of Lamium in North Louisiana that looked like a hybrid between Lamium amplexicaule and Lamium purpureum. 

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